Interactive dialogue on trafficking in persons, especially women and children

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Oral statement submitted by Dominicans for Justice and Peace (Order of Preachers) at the HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL – 35th Session, Geneva.
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Interactive dialogue on trafficking in persons, especially women and children
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Mr. President,

Dominicans for Justice and Peace expresses deep appreciation for the report of the Special Rapporteur in identifying standards that are necessary to eradicate human trafficking in business supply chains. This focus is welcome in that it addresses the demand for human trafficking – in this case for cheap and even slave labour, whereas most of the discourse around human trafficking usually focuses on the suppliers: the human traffickers.

While it was important for the Special Rapporteur to start by consulting willing businesses, we hope that the recommendations made to the States will be taken seriously through legislation that requires even unwilling businesses to take measures to tackle trafficking in persons in their operations and supply chains. This should apply to employers in all forms of business as well as in casual and informal areas of work, such as domestic and farm work, that are susceptible to creating the demand for human trafficking.

Besides the urgency of dealing with the demand for labour exploitation, we believe we must equally deal with the demand for sexual exploitation. From our experience on the ground, we particularly want to highlight the urgency for States to address the growing online sexual exploitation of children and even of babies, and to bring the perpetrators to justice. This requires prosecutors and judges to be properly trained in the reality of human trafficking.

States also have the duty to protect those who are vulnerable to being trafficked. This should happen through more intensive information and education campaigns in communities at risk, through urgent economic development programs for such communities, through the creation and strengthening of adequate reporting mechanisms at local levels, and through the rigorous regulation of labour recruiters.

Mr. President,

If States do not address both the demand and supply dimensions of human trafficking simultaneously, we are unlikely to make any headway in eradicating this modern-day slavery.

We have one question for the Special Rapporteur: Do you have any suggestions for States to address more efficiently the factors creating the demand for human trafficking? 

Thank you Mr. President

 

(04 July 2017)