Sr. Nadine Buchanan Honored for Human Trafficking Work

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Nadine Buchanan
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Dominican Sister of Peace Sr. Nadine Buchanan was honored with an Ohio Liberators Award at the second annual ceremony on January 20, 2013. The awards are presented in eight categories to recognize the efforts of Ohioans in the fight against human trafficking, with winners determined by popular vote through online polls. Sr. Nadine won in the Outstanding Volunteer category.

Sr. Nadine has worked tirelessly on the issue of human trafficking for about one year now, volunteering many hours with a number of organizations that serve human trafficking victims and educate the public about the issue. She works with TraffickFree, on various SOAP (Save Our Adolescents from Prostitution) outreach projects; Doma, a Columbus-based organization working with human trafficking survivors; the local Salvation Army chapter and their anti-human trafficking efforts, particularly The Well program; and the Central Ohio Rescue and Restore Coalition (CORRC).

Much of Sr. Nadine's work has been with SOAP, which has brought her and other volunteers around the country to distribute bars of soap with victim hotline numbers to hotels, in effort to reach victims with a message of help in the very places where much of the sexual slavery situations take place. She notes that sexual trafficking is more prevalent surrounding large sporting events in the country, and so SOAP goes where the events are scheduled. This week, Sr. Nadine is headed to New Jersey to work with hotels before the SuperBowl, and at the end of the March, she will be in Texas preceding a national NASCAR event and the NCAA Final Four basketball games.

Sr. Nadine joins her efforts with others in the congregation who are working for an end to human trafficking. After much study, discussion, and prayer, the Dominican Sisters of Peace adopted a corporate stance against human trafficking in February 2013, pledging to dedicate resources and efforts to the cause. . A growing number of voices, particularly in the Catholic Church, are speaking out against human trafficking, including the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, who characterize it as "a horrific crime against the fundamental rights and dignity of the human person."

"So many people have no idea that this modern-day slavery is happening all around us in this country. I was once in a similar state of ignorance, but now my eyes have been opened, particularly through witnessing the pain and suffering of human trafficking victims I've come to know," shares Sr. Nadine. "I hope my efforts and those of so many others will help to raise awareness, and eventually help to stop this atrocity."

(23 January 2014)